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May and June 2021 have been very tough months in Mongolia, with the number of COVID-19 positive cases rising from 37,285 to 115,478 in just two months. The number of deaths has also increased; rising from five at the end of April to 115 in May and 563 in June.

Full review

On 1 March, the Ministry of Health reported 45 new cases of COVID-19 in Mongolia, which brings the confirmed number of cases to 2,952; and represents a spike of almost four-fold in one month. Ulaanbaatar city remains the epicentre of infection with local transmission in 15 provinces.

Full review

April has been one of the most difficult months for Mongolia with the number of COVID-19 positive cases increasing four-fold from the end of March. Ulaanbaatar city continues to be the epicentre of infections in the country; the number of positive cases has risen from 7,000 to 31,362.

Full review

The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Ulaanbaatar city has been rapidly increasing since 1 February, requiring the Government to take extreme measures, including a strict lockdown, to control the infection rate in the city. The lockdown in Ulaanbaatar city started at 6am on 11 February and lasted until 6am on 23 February; public celebrations and gatherings for the Lunar New Year were banned. Child protection centres and One Stop Service Centres (OSSCs) were among the list of businesses and services that were allowed to operate during the lockdown.

Full review

The Government has reported that it has full control over the spread of COVID-19 infections in the countryside, but there has been a rapid rise of cluster infections in Ulaanbaatar city, detected through contact tracing, testing and active surveillance. The clusters include state and private hospitals, bank branches, car dealers, persons living in apartment complexes, pharmacies, and other business settings, confirming there is community transmission in Ulaanbaatar city.

Full review

 UNFPA Mongolia SitRep for COVID-19 response, covering the period from 1 to 31 July 2020

Full review

Every year, millions of girls are subjected to practices that harm them physically and emotionally, with the full knowledge and consent of their families, friends and communities. Such practices result in acute and often irreversible harm but may be accepted as normal, even beneficial.

Full review

Disease outbreaks affect women and men differently, and pandemics make existing inequalities for women and girls and discrimination of other marginalized groups such as persons with disabilities and those in extreme poverty, worse. This needs to be considered, given the different impacts surrounding detection and access to treatment for women and men.

Women represent 70 percent of the health and social sector workforce globally and special attention should be given to how their work environment may expose them to discrimination, as well as thinking about their sexual and reproductive health and psychosocial needs as frontline health workers.

Full review

Not so long ago, most people had large families: five children, on average.

Where once there was one global fertility rate, today there are many, with differences wider than at any point in human history

Full review

The "Mongolian Sustainable Development Vision-2030”, was endorsed by the Resolution #19 of the Great State Hural of Mongolia (The Parliament of Mongolia), on 19th February 2016. The sexual and reproductive health and rights-related objectives and indicators were articulated

Full review

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